Monthly Archives: July 2013

Persistent Patterns

When the President says accumulation of wealth at the top is detrimental, he is narrating a causal relationship. When Paul Ryan says our economy would be much better if he and Romney were elected, he is deriving a narrative from … Continue reading

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The Rent Reduction

Economists reduce value to “the rent,” and the extension of rents, because economic value, especially with a political dimension, is difficult to measure. What is the expected value of something that is difficult to measure? It becomes a philosophical endeavor, … Continue reading

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The Comparative Dialectic

When landed aristocracy had to compete with the capitalist, the rate of substitution quickly expanded. Rents extend with a higher degree of optimality. Innovation rapidly occurs, operantly conditioned by the invisible hand. (Again, keep in mind, in a free market, … Continue reading

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The Rate of Substitution

Since the American Revolution, risk-value continues to converge despite attempts to forestall the dialectic (the rate of substitution) by means of mergers and acquisitions. M&A, by means of a comparative dialectic, unwittingly gains the value of the risk being avoided. … Continue reading

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Rising Rents, Convergence of the Values

After the American Revolution the new elite operationalized aristocratic authority with the right to self-determine. What they rebelled against was operationalized with the expected risk. The values of meritocracy converged with the values of aristocratic identity and the extension of … Continue reading

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Narrating the Causal Effect

Causation is narrated to form a philosophy of the inexistence that Objectivists describe as our one-and-only “objective identity.” This causal identity (selfish determination) forms a fully operational, existential philosophy that defines public-policy space. While it may not appear to be … Continue reading

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