The Perfect Model of Moral Measure

The perfect moral measure is unconstrained. Naturally, it resists nothing. It is so passive it agresses a measurable existence even in the most seemingly immeasurable proportion.

Science aggressively endeavors to discover the passive resistance of a final reduction, but what we actually find is an active resistance. Physicists then say that just the act of measuring the absence of existence is measurably something, thus aggressing the passive resistance (actualizing the phenomenology of the mind) like Hegel described it.

Science does not intend to describe a theistic interpretation of objective reality. The purpose is to know the thesis of independence, not the theism of a natural existence; but it just happens, by natural design, to be dependent on knowing it, trying to transact an objective interpretation of reality (the phenomenology of the mind) independent of its self, which does not measurably exist.

Saying that reality does not exist independent of the self is solipsism, and is very similar to Objectivism. Just because reality cannot be independently perceived does not mean there is actually a real divine presence that makes things exist out of nothing. Of course, that is illogical because nothing does not measurably exist, and like the scientist says, if it can’t be measured it does not exist.

Since, independent of the self, there is no real objective measure of what reality actually is, then the self is all that really matters, according to the solipsist and the Objectivist.

If there is one thing we definitely know, we do not exist independent of nature. Every time we try to assert our independence and act with final authority, God shows up: nature possesses us, making the necessary correction on demand!

When it comes to the risk, we exist to resist: aggressively existing measure, passively resisting nothing.

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About griffithlighton

musician-composer, artist, writer, philosopher and political economist (M.A.)
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